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IF YOU BELIEVE SOMEONE CLOSE TO YOU IS ADDICTED TO AMBIEN, PLEASE CONTACT NATIONAL TREATMENT CENTERS FOR A FREE, CONFIDENTIAL, NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION AND TREATMENT INFORMATION ON WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP YOUR LOVED ONE.

Ativan has a high potential for addiction. Ativan can cause psychological and physical addiction. Individuals develop an addiction to Ativan because it produces feelings of well-being. Once an individual has moved from abusing Ativan and developed an addiction to Ativan they will often get multiple prescriptions from different doctors to support their addiction. Ativan activates the brain’s reward systems. The promise of reward is very intense, causing the individual to crave more Ativan and to focus his or her activities around taking the drug. The ability of Ativan to strongly activate brain reward mechanisms and its ability to chemically alter the normal functioning of these systems is what produces an addiction to Ativan. Ativan also reduce a person’s level of consciousness, harming the ability to think or be fully aware of present surroundings.

Effects of Ativan

The common effects of Ativan use include clumsiness, sleepiness, amnesia, insomnia, agitation, impairment of liver function, chronic intoxication, depression, headache, and visual problems. Cases of developing leucopenia on Ativan use are there. Overdose of Ativan may affect the central nervous system and lead to drowsiness to coma. Fatal cases have also been reported.

Symptoms of Ativan Addiction

Drowsiness is the most visible symptom of Ativan addiction. When using in combination with other drugs, symptoms may include ataxia, hypotension, coma, and in rare cases, death.

On abrupt discontinuance of Ativan, withdrawal symptoms may appear. Spasm, tremor, vomiting, and sweating are the most commonly seen withdrawal symptoms. The severity of symptoms depends on the doses received and duration of abuse.

Treatment

Withdrawal from Ativan can be problematic, and in some cases, potentially life threatening. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been used successfully in the treatment of Ativan addicts.

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The widespread availability of drugs such as Ativan has made them common as drugs of addiction. Most people who take Ativan take it responsibly; however, the nonmedical use or abuse of Ativan and other prescription medications remains a serious public health concern. Long-term users typically develop a tolerance to the drugs, requiring larger doses to achieve the desired effects. A psychological and/or physical dependence can develop, making it difficult to discontinue use. Some individuals who abuse prescription medication such as Ativan take it to bring them down after using stimulants such as ecstasy or cocaine. Others take them to enhance the effects of alcohol. They are also commonly used as replacement drugs when a user’s drug of first choice is not available.

Ativan has a high potential for addiction. Ativan can cause psychological and physical addiction. Individuals develop an addiction to Ativan because it produces feelings of well-being. Once an individual has moved from abusing Ativan and developed an addiction to Ativan they will often get multiple prescriptions from different doctors to support their addiction. Ativan activates the brain’s reward systems. The promise of reward is very intense, causing the individual to crave more Ativan and to focus his or her activities around taking the drug. The ability of Ativan to strongly activate brain reward mechanisms and its ability to chemically alter the normal functioning of these systems is what produces an addiction to Ativan. Ativan also reduce a person’s level of consciousness, harming the ability to think or be fully aware of present surroundings.

“About 70 percent of Americans – approximately 191 million people – visit a health care provider, such as a primary care physician, at least once every 2 years. Thus, health care providers are in a unique position not only to prescribe needed medications appropriately, but also to identify prescription drug abuse when it exists and help the patient recognize the problem, set goals for recovery, and seek appropriate treatment when necessary. Screening for any type of substance abuse can be incorporated into routine history taking with questions about what prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines the patient is taking and why. Screening also can be performed if a patient presents with specific symptoms associated with problem use of a substance.

Over time, providers should note any rapid increases in the amount of a medication needed – which may indicate the development of tolerance – or frequent requests for refills before the quantity prescribed should have been used. They should also be alert to the fact that those addicted to prescription medications may engage in “doctor shopping,” moving from provider to provider in an effort to get multiple prescriptions for the drug they abuse. Preventing or stopping prescription drug abuse is an important part of patient care. However, health care providers should not avoid prescribing or administering strong CNS depressants and painkillers, if they are needed. ” (The National Institute on Drug Abuse)

Ativan, the brand name for Lorazepam, is an anti-anxiety drug. It belongs to the benzodiazepine family and is a Central Nervous System (CNS) depressant. This drug is a mild tranquilizer as well as a sedative.

Ativan is highly addictive and its regular use may lead to psychological and physical dependency. It can produce feelings of well-being and can alter the normal functioning of body systems. Ativan activates the brain’s reward systems and make the individual to crave more. In addition, Ativan can decrease a person’s level of consciousness.

Ativan is easily and widely available in the United States and is a common drug of abuse in the country. Though many use it with care or under supervision, the abuse of Ativan is a growing public health problem.

Ativan is available in pill as well as liquid forms. Tablets are off-white colored and normally insoluble in water. Liquid Ativan is intended for intramuscular or intravenous injection. The effects of the drug are usually felt one to thirty minutes after injecting it or 1 to 6 hours after orally taken.

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